Trap Garden: One man’s vision for food secure communities in Nashville and beyond

Nashville-based Trap Garden is helping to put fresh foods on to plates for low-income communities living in food deserts by assisting in the creation of community gardens and the promotion of healthy eating.

The Trap Garden seeks to motivate and inspire others to be self-sufficient – to not depend on a major grocery store or business to provide them with their daily needs.

The social enterprise was set up by Robert “Rob Veggies” Horton, whose motivation stems from his own experiences growing up in a St. Louis, Missouri neighborhood with few fresh, healthy food items. Moving to Nashville to attend Tennessee State University (TSU), Robert Horton was frustrated with having to drive miles away from home for a grocery store that supplied quality, fresh products.

The then student set out to solve the issue by getting involved in the community garden at TSU, where he could learn about gardening from people who were knowledgeable and experienced in growing their own food. 

Trap Garden essentially began with Rob Horton learning to grow his own vegetables and herbs, and the social enterprise is now dedicated to assisting others.

Trap Garden says: “We create gardens in unlikely places that foster opportunities for community engagement, education, and support, as well as economic empowerment, by returning the community and its resources to the people.”

Since 2014, Trap Garden has launched a community garden in South Nashville with the help of local residents, a brunch cafe at a well-known restaurant in North Nashville to raise awareness and inspire visitors to eat locally-sourced food, and has been involved in school programmes to get kids interested in gardening.

Trap Garden

Rosa Medea is Life & Soul Magazine’s Chief. She writes about lifestyle including sustainable and green living. She also offers content services to businesses and individuals at Rosamedea.com

 

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