Plant-based bottles, made from sustainable plant sugars, could be on supermarket shelves by 2023

Plant-based bottles, made from sustainable plant sugars, which would decompose in a year when composted, are being developed by renewable chemicals company Avantium.

The Netherlands-based biochemicals company plans to break down sustainable plant sugars from corn, wheat or beets into simple chemical structures that can then be rearranged to form a new plant-based plastic. The plant plastic, which is designed to be resilient enough to contain carbonate drinks, could appear on supermarket shelves as packaging for soft drinks and beer as early as 2023.

Trials have shown that the plant plastic would decompose in one year using a composter, and a few years longer if left in normal outdoor conditions. Ideally, Avantium expressed the plant-based plastic should be recycled.

Avantium’s chief executive, Tom van Aken told The Guardian: “This plastic has very attractive sustainability credentials because it uses no fossil fuels, and can be recycled – but would also degrade in nature much faster than normal plastics do.”

Avantium’s all plant-based plastic project will initially make around 5,000 tonnes of plastic every year using plant sugars. The company expects its production to grow as demand for renewable plastics climbs.

Avantium’s chief executive, Tom van Aken, says he hopes to greenlight a major investment in the world-leading bioplastics plant in the Netherlands by the end of the year. The project, which remains on track despite the coronavirus lockdown, is set to reveal partnerships with other food and drink companies later in the summer.

The project has the backing of Coca-Cola, Danone, and Carlsberg, which hopes to sell its pilsner in a cardboard bottle lined with an inner layer of plant plastic.

Images Credit: Avantium

Rosa Medea is Life & Soul Magazine’s Chief. She writes about lifestyle including sustainable and green living. She also offers content services to businesses and individuals at Rosamedea.com

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